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If you need immediate support or help, consider calling 999 or (if you are on campus or in University residences) call the University Security Services on 0113 343 2222. More information about support in a crisis can be found on our website.

You can also use the SafeZone app while on campus to ask for help. 

This covers a range behaviours and incidents that are unacceptable and in some cases a crime.  We have provided some definitions to show what these terms mean.  However, these will not cover every possible behaviour or experience, so don't  worry if what happened to you is not captured below.   If you experienced or witnessed something that made you feel sad, scared or uncomfortable, that is valid. 

Definitions 

Hate Crimes are any criminal offence if it is perceived by the victim or any other person, to be motivated by hostility or prejudice based on a person's (perceived or otherwise known) disability, race, religion, sexual orientation or gender identity. These include physical attacks, such as assault, damage to property, or the threat of attack, such as inciting hatred by words, pictures or videos, offensive letters, abusive or obscene telephone calls, groups hanging around to intimidate, and unfounded malicious complaints.

Hate Incidents are any non-crime incidents which are perceived by the victim or any other person to be motivated by hostility or prejudice based on a person's disability, race, religion, sexual orientation or gender identity or perceived disability, race, religion, sexual orientation or gender identity. This could include verbal or online abuse, insults, such as taunting, offensive leaflets and posters, abusive gestures, bullying at school or in the workplace.

What mainly separates a Hate Crime from a Hate Incident is whether it is a criminal offence.  If it becomes a criminal offence then the person can be prosecuted.  It is possible for something to be an initial hate incident to become a Hate Crime. However Hate Incidents can also be recorded by the Police as well as other organisations.  So it is still taken seriously.  

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